Tax Returns of the Rich and Famous

America’s first billionaire, John D. Rockefeller, once said that “if your only goal is to become rich, you’ll never achieve it.” But some of us still manage to achieve it, and the rest of us want to know how.

Since 1992, the IRS Statistics of Income Division has issued an annual report examining The 400 Individual Tax Returns Reporting the Largest Adjusted Gross Incomes. I know what you’re thinking — the IRS “Statistics of Income” division is where fun goes to die. But read on — there’s some pretty interesting stuff buried in this year’s 13-page report.

What does it take to join the club? Well, for 2009, you had to report $77.4 million in adjusted gross income. Now, that may sound like a lot. But it’s actually down from $109.7 million in 2008, and down even further from the $138.8 record high in 2007. Of course, $77.4 million just gets you in. The 400 earners averaged $202.4 million. (If that sounds like a lot, it’s actually down from a staggering high of $334.8 million in 2007.)
How do the top 400 make their money? Probably not how you imagine. Just 8.6% of it came from salaries and wages. 6.6% came from taxable interest; 13.0% came from taxable dividends; and 19.9% came from partnerships and S corporations. Once again, capital gains made up the biggest share of the top 400′s income. For 2009, it was 45.8%, or $92.6 million each. In fact, the top 400 individuals reported 16% of the entire country’s capital gains! However, that amount was significantly down from 2008, when the top 400 averaged $153.7 million in gains. Clearly, the 2008 economy and stock market crash took a toll on the super-rich as well as the rest of us.
What do they actually pay? 2009′s top 400 averaged $170.3 million in taxable income and paid $40.9 million in tax. That makes their average tax rate 19.9% — up from the 18.1% they paid in 2008. Why the higher rate? Remember, most of their income consists of capital gains, taxed at a maximum of 15%. When the percentage of their income consisting of capital gains goes down, their average rate goes up.
On average, the top 400 are a generous group. 387 of them reported charitable contributions, with the average deduction weighing in at $16.4 million. The top 400 as a whole claimed 4.0% of the nation’s total charitable deductions, down from 5.2% in 2008. (You’ve got to wonder what goes wrong in 13 people’s lives that let them earn tens or hundreds of millions of dollars without deducting a dime for charitable gifts. Maybe they just want to “give” more to Uncle Sam!)

3,869 taxpayers have appeared in the top 400 list since the IRS started tracking them in 1992. But just 27% have appeared more than once. And only 2% have appeared 10 or more times. It’s worth noting that some of today’s highest-profile earners fall short of this group. Billionaire Warren Buffett, who inspired the “Buffett Rule” that would tax million-dollar incomes at a minimum 30%, reported earning “just” $62.9 million in 2011. He probably won’t make the cutoff. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney reported earning $20.7 million in 2010 and $20.9 million in 2011. As rich as that sounds, he’s nowhere near the top 400.

We realize you may find these numbers comical. Who makes $200 million in a single year? But someday when your business catches fire and lands you in the top 400, you’ll get pretty heated at the thought of paying $40 million in tax. That’s when you’ll be glad we gave you a proactive plan for paying less tax, contact us at: 773-728-1500.

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Short Sale or Foreclosure – the Income Tax Consequences

We are CPAs in Chicago and provide the following summary for the benefit of Taxpayers in Chicago and surrounding suburbs.

These days a lot of home owners or real estate investors are encountering numerous questions about the tax consequences of these situations. That’s why it’s more important than ever for real estate owners to understand the basics of how the IRS views tax forgiveness.

How does the IRS view a short sale or foreclosure?

short sale is the discount a mortgage holder may allow in order to sell the property, even though doing so will short or discount the note. This generally results in a benefit to the debtor because the mortgage is reduced.

The process, of course, is different in a foreclosure, but the result is essentially the same.  The mortgage holder forecloses on the property, takes possession or sells the property on the courthouse steps, and will probably end up losing on the original mortgage. In effect, the borrower usually doesn’t have to pay the full mortgage, and whatever the lender can get for the property reduces the mortgage amount and the lender will often take a loss on the rest.

IRS frankly doesn’t care if a property is going through a short sale or foreclosure. The IRS is going to determine if Forgiveness of Debt took place and if it should be taxed to the taxpayer. Keep in mind though that the lender does not always forgive debt in a foreclosure or short sale. If the lender gets a deficiency judgment or comes after the homeowner for the unpaid amount, there is no debt forgiveness and thus no taxable income.

However, for situations where the lender does forgive the debt, determining what should be taxed can be a complicated question with lots of variations based on the facts and circumstances.

Keep in mind that, in almost every situation, the IRS boils the transaction down to the analysis of four questions:

.Question 1: Was the property sold for less than the mortgage or mortgages on the property?

Easy to calculate, simply add up all of the debt on the property (first and second mortgages included), and subtract it from the final sales price. If the result is a negative number, then there is a presumption the seller or prior owner is facing Forgiveness of Debt Income.

In case of foreclosure, it’s a little more difficult to determine the amounts in the equation above, because sometimes the bank/mortgage holder hasn’t sold the property yet; they simply took possession of the property in the foreclosure. Essentially, the calculation can’t be completed until the lender sells the property and their loss is determined.

Question 2: Was the mortgage or mortgages considered recourse or non-recourse debt?

If there is a presumption of debt forgiveness as determined in Question 1, the taxpayer next has to find out if the debt is recourse debt. This simply means the debtor signed personally guaranteeing the debt, or in other words, is personally obligated to pay the mortgage. This is actually an easy fact to determine.

A quick document review by an attorney can help the homeowner determine if the debt is recourse or not. The good news is if they aren’t personally liable, then they don’t have to pay the debt and they don’t have Forgiveness of Debt Income.

            Question 3: Is there Forgiveness of Debt Income after the basis on the property and any loss is calculated?

Often taxpayers overlook this aspect of the analysis.  Assuming there is recourse debt, and hence Forgiveness of Debt Income, taxpayers shouldn’t forget to calculate their loss on the property as a whole. This loss can offset any Forgiveness of Debt Income.

In this more complicated equation, the taxpayer would start with the sales price of the property and then subtract the adjusted basis on the property (i.e., the net cost for the property after adjusting for various items like depreciation or home improvements). This process will tell the homeowner if there is a gain or loss on the property. In sum, a loss would be deductible against the Forgiveness of Debt Income. Note, however, that a primary residence is going to be treated differently during this stage of the analysis (see below).

If there is Forgiveness of Debt Income from recourse debt and the loss on the sale doesn’t wipe out the gain, or it isn’t a primary residence, then the taxpayer’s only option to avoid being taxed on the forgiveness is to qualify under the insolvency or bankruptcy rules provided by the IRS. Essentially, these rules require the taxpayer’s total liabilities to exceed total assets, whether married or single (the details of which are discussed in IRS Publication 4681).

One final option that doesn’t allow the taxpayer to discharge the income but permits deferring the tax over time is to reduce the basis on other real estate owned by the taxpayer by using Form 982.

Question 4: Was the property in question the primary residence of the taxpayer?

The rules have been changed when it comes to principal or primary residences. Congress passed and President Bush signed into law the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 to provide relief to families who were going through a short sale or foreclosure on their primary residence through the end of 2012. This law essentially wipes out any acquisition indebtedness (not second mortgages unrelated to the purchase) and is a specific election made on a tax return. (Note there is a limit of $2 million of interest and debt for married couples and a lower limit for single individuals). Taxpayers should consult with their tax advisor regarding the specifics of this exception and they qualify.

Finally, I would be remiss to not mention loan modifications and the impact they may have on a tax bill. Rest assured, most loan modifications don’t create taxable income as they simply modify the terms of a loan to help a debtor better make his or her payments. However, if a lender actually reduces the principal amount of the loan, sometimes called a cram down, then the debtor better expect a 1099 for Cancellation of Debt Income and speak with a tax advisor.

Make sure your Tax Advisor knows how to apply correctly the tax deductions that are allowed.

In summary, if you going through a loan modification, short-sale, foreclosure, or deed in lieu, please know that, we at TaxCutters can help you through the tax paperwork process.  Please give us a call at: 773-728-1500.

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Corporation Tax: How Business Website Expenses Are Deducted

With the explosion of online businesses, one would think that there would be a standard method of deducting the cost of your business website. But some questions still exist as to what part of a website is considered software, and to date, the IRS has not fully clarified that issue for tax purposes. As a Tax Accountant in Chicago, I’ve recently seen an explosion of questions regarding deductibility of assets in online businesses.

Purchased Websites – If the website is purchased from a contractor who is at economic risk should the software not perform, the design costs are amortized (ratably deducted) over the three-year period, beginning with the month in which the website is placed in service. For 2012, non-customized computer software placed in service during the year qualifies as Sec 179 property and can be written off in full up to the limits of this special expense deduction.

In-House Developed Websites – If, instead of being purchased, the website design is “developed” by the company or designed by an independent contractor who is not at risk should the software not perform, the company launching the website can choose among alternative treatments, one of which is deducting the costs in the year that the costs are paid, or accrued, depending on the taxpayer’s overall accounting method. Or, as an alternative, the costs may be amortized under the three-year rule.

Non-Software Expenses – Some website design costs, such as graphics, may not be classified as software and must be deducted over the useful life of the element. Non-software portions of the design with a useful life of no more than a year are currently deductible.

Advertising Content – Advertising costs are generally currently deductible. Thus, the costs of website content that is advertising are generally, currently deductible.

Cost Before Business Starts – Business expenses that are incurred or accrued prior to the actual activation of the business are generally not deductible until the business is terminated or sold. However, a taxpayer can elect to deduct up to $5,000 of the costs in the year that the business starts and amortize the costs in excess of $5,000 over a period of 180 months (15 years), beginning with the month that the business starts.

We provide bookkeeping and tax services for many businesses including online businesses.  If you have any questions regarding Corporation taxes, please call us at 773-728-1500.

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Chicago Businesses – Watch out for scams

Many of us are looking for cash. We’re all looking for ways to create wealth and save taxes. But when a prospective tax scheme or business strategy sounds too good to be true, it usually is.

Many times I have seen how a client became caught up in an elaborate business ruse, and as aCPA in Chicago area, who have helped countless businesses in filing their corporation tax returns, I have to sort through the resulting disaster for them. They never had to needlessly lose money in this way.

Considering these days economic times, when the wolves come out in sheep’s clothing, there are more crooks out there, and they’re looking for an edge. It’s a recipe for disaster.

Some of the most common scams you should watch out for:

The non licensed business coach, or tax adviser

“Coach” is a title someone often uses when they weren’t smart enough to finish school and get a graduate degree. Now there are great reasons for “coaching” in certain areas of business, but when they start giving tax and legal advice, watch out.

There are a plethora of call center operations that rope would-be entrepreneurs into paying money to talk to someone wearing sandals and a headset who has no business offering tax and legal advice, or doesn’t know anything about running a business.

The “I have a deal for you guys.”

It’s called “affinity fraud.” A friend or relative tells you that someone in their neighborhood or church has found a “great new business” to invest in, and you should chip in big money, too.

On its own, investing in a start-up can be a great idea if you can stomach the risk, but watch out if someone says you don’t need a lawyer or makes big promises. Be realistic, and make sure you use a lawyer to properly document the investment. Suing to recoup losses can often prove too costly to make a lawsuit worth it.

The corporate credit “shelf corporation.”

I have had numerous clients come through my office wondering what they might do with a “shelf corporation” they paid $5,000 to $15,000 for.

Many of  were sold on flashy terms like Dunn and Bradstreet numbers, Paydex scores and unsecured credit, and how they would somehow win larger loans by using the shelf corporation name. The truth is there is no short-cut process. Building corporate credit takes time.

The bogus state filing fee bill.

You register a corporation or LLC in your state, or make the other required filings. Then, all of a sudden you get a piece of mail with a state insignia on the envelope, telling you that you owe another fee.

Plain and simple, these can often be a scam. There are so many times I’ve had clients call me and say, “We got this piece of mail about a state fee. What’s this all about?” And I say, “It’s a scam. Don’t pay it.” And they say, “Really?” Don’t ignore any notice you receive that looks official, but make sure you get a second opinion.

Conclusion

Unfortunately the list could go on and on. So what’s the best way to avoid a scam?

Ask for credentials, make sure you understand who is actually going to be doing the work for you or giving advice, perform due, and get a second opinion from a trusted licensed adviser when tax and legal matters are at stake.

Finally, don’t forget, if it’s too good to be true, it probably is.

Don’t forget to call us at 773-728-1500 if you have any questions related to tax planning issues.  We also provide bookkeeping services for businesses in the Chicagoland area.

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Black Friday Savings -Tax Perspectives

We are accountants in Chicago, and we keep an eye on any significant changes that would affect every taxpayer one way or another. Let’s analyze last week’s celebration of our most uniquely American holiday and no, we are not talking about Thanksgiving. We’re talking aboutBlack Friday, our national homage to consumerism, conspicuous consumption, and all things capitalist. Walmart and other “big box” retailers pounded a final nail in Thanksgiving’s coffin, opening at 8 PM that night so shoppers could skip out on the pumpkin pie to save a couple hundred bucks on a flat-screen TV.

And this year, Walmart founder Sam Walton’s heirs, who still own 48% of the company, have taken a lesson from their own shoppers. Only, the Waltons aren’t just saving hundreds. They’ve found a way to save millions, just by accelerating a regularly-scheduled dividend payment from January 2 to December 27. (Apparently, they think “everyday low prices” applies to their tax bills, too!)

Under current law, tax on dividends is capped at just 15%. The Walmart dividend will be 39.75 cents/share, and the Waltons own approximately 1.6 billion shares. That means the family’s payout will be $636 million, and their federal income tax bill on that payout will be a hefty $95.4 million.

If Walmart waits until January 1 to make the payment, though, taxes could go up — possibly way up. That’s because the so-called “Bush tax cuts,” in effect since 2003, expire. At that point, dividends lose their special protection, and the top rate jumps to 39.6%. Congress and the White House have both said they want to extend the current rates for most taxpayers. But if they can’t come to some agreement to the contrary, the Waltons will pay an extra $156 millionin tax on their dividend. (A recent CNN poll shows that two-thirds of Americans expect Washington officials to act like “spoiled children” rather than “responsible adults” during those upcoming negotiations, so the Waltons better cross their fingers!)

Waiting until January 1 would also make the Walton heirs subject to the new “Unearned Income Medicare Contribution” of 3.8%. (This is a special tax on investment income for taxpayers making over $200,000, or $250,000 for joint filers.) That would bring the effective tax rate on the January 2nd payment all the way up to 43.4%, and bring the Waltons’ final tax bill up to a whopping $276 million. Ouch!

Walmart is hardly the only company accelerating dividends to beat the tax hike. One financial data firm estimates that 109 public companies will issue special dividend payments before January 1, more than three times as many as in recent years. Those special payments will actually be enough to give the IRS a significant spike in 2012 tax revenue. The New York Timesreported last week that two recent studies show that companies where board members own a large percentage of company shares are likeliest to make this move. The three Walton family members who serve on the company’s board of directors rescued themselves from last week’s vote, but a company spokesman confirmed the company did make the decision because of uncertainty over taxes.

It may be too late to take advantage of Black Friday shopping specials at Walmart. But us, as theAccountants in Chicago say it’s surely not too late to take advantage of Black Friday planning for taxes! Tax planning is the key to paying the legal minimum, especially with the “fiscal cliff” looming on the horizon. And a good tax plan can pay for a holiday season full of gifts and fun. Socall us773-728-1500 if you don’t already have a plan, and let us, the Chicago CPA show you what we can do. We’re sure you’ll give thanks for the savings!

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SMART TAX MOVES BY THE END OF THE YEAR

The annual scramble to make smart tax moves before Dec. 31 is proving especially vexing this year, here are some of our CPA in Chicago suggestions.

Congress still hasn’t settled 2013 tax rates on income, investments, large gifts and estates. Deductions and other breaks are also in doubt, now that politicians from both parties are calling for cutbacks—although in different ways.  Many questions remain unanswered even for the 2012 tax year. For example, the Internal Revenue Service on Nov. 13 warned lawmakers that if they don’t act soon, the alternative minimum tax, which reduces the value of some tax breaks, will apply to 33 million households for 2012 rather than four million. More than 60 million people might not be able to file returns or receive refunds until late March, the IRS says, because it would have to reprogram computers.

Yet despite the uncertainties, year-end tax planning is possible and it will impact your Income Tax. We do know that 2013 will mark the debut of the 3.8% flat levy on net investment income for joint filers with adjusted gross income of $250,000 or more ($200,000 for singles). Congress passed this levy, plus a 0.9% increase in Medicare tax for affluent earners, to help fund the massive 2010 health-care changes. The tax introduces new layers of complexity into investors’ planning. (For more details, see box on this page.)

Big unknowns include the top rates on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends, both now 15%. The rate on gains could hit 23.8% or more, and the rate on dividends could be as high as 43.4%. .

There are few ways taxpayers can shrink 2012 taxes after Dec. 31, other than contributing to some retirement accounts or health savings accounts. Here are moves to consider before year end, plus a few to avoid.

  • Make charitable gifts. The best value often comes from donating appreciated assets, because donors can get a full deduction while skipping capital-gains tax on the asset’s growth. Cash donations to charities are often deductible up to 50% of adjusted gross income.
  • If you want to donate IRA assets to charity, wait a bit longer. Since 2006, IRA owners 70½ and older have been able to give up to $100,000 of the required payout directly to a charity. There’s no deduction, but no taxable income either. This wildly popular provision expired at the beginning of 2012, but lawmakers might yet reinstate it—as they did in 2010.
  • Make an extra mortgage payment, or pay down principal. Usually taxpayers can’t accelerate more than one month of mortgage interest, but that helps a bit if you think the mortgage-interest deduction will be curbed next year. Or find cash to pay down principal, which reduces overall interest.
  • Maximize contributions to employer-sponsored retirement plans. Unlike with IRAs, the deadline for 401(k) contributions is Dec. 31. This year, the employee limit is $17,000, or $22,500 for workers 50 or older.
  • Harvest capital losses, up to a point. Investment losses can offset investment gains plus up to $3,000 of ordinary income, both for single and joint filers. Note that “wash sale” rules penalize buyers who acquire the same asset within 30 days of selling at a loss.
  • Use up funds in a medical flexible-spending account. They often don’t carry over, although some employers will allow workers to spend 2012 funds in the first weeks of 2013. Next year, the contribution limit will be $2,500, less than some employers now allow.
  • Accelerate medical expenses. The threshold for deducting these expenses, now 7.5% of adjusted gross income (10% for AMT payers), rises to 10% next year for most taxpayers. People who are 65 and older, however, can use the 7.5% threshold through 2016. This phase-in will be useful, say advisers, because most taxpayers claiming large medical deductions are in the final years of life. Note that the IRS’s list of what’s deductible is far broader than what insurance typically reimburses, extending to contact-lens solution, assisted-living costs and even special education.
  • Write next semester’s tuition checks before year end. The American Opportunity Tax Credit allows qualified taxpayers to get a benefit this year for next spring’s tuition if the payment is made before year end—even though the credit is set to expire for 2013.
  • Prepay state taxes. Deductions for state and local income, sales and property taxes are already disallowed by the alternative minimum tax, and they might shrink further next year, even if Congress reinstates the expired sales-tax deduction for 2012. Consider accelerating next year’s state tax payments if they don’t throw you into the AMT, in which case you’ll lose the write-off altogether.
  • Make gifts up to $13,000 to relatives or friends. Such gifts are tax-free, and the number of recipients isn’t limited as long as the value of each gift doesn’t exceed $13,000. Cash is often the best gift, as presents of assets such as stock carry their “cost basis” with them.
  • Contribute to 529 education savings accounts. Assets in these accounts enjoy tax-free growth, and withdrawals from them are tax-free when used for tuition and other qualified expenses. Some states also provide tax benefits to givers. These accounts also offer a rare benefit: Contributions leave the giver’s estate, yet he or she can take back the principal without penalty if the money is needed. Contributions do count toward the $13,000 gift limit, however.

Please call Accountants in Chicago at 773-728-1500. We can help you plan and get the right tax deductions.

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New Tax Rules To Watch Out For!

Here’s a quick rundown of what to expect starting January 1, when a bunch of current tax rules expire, and some new rules take effect. : The Bush tax cuts expire.

That means the top rates on ordinary income goes from 35% to 39.6%; the top rate on capital gains goes from 15% to 20%; and the top rate on qualified dividends jumps from 15% to 39.6%. Much of the debate over tax rates focuses on income at the top. But, the expiration of the Bush tax cuts affects all of us. The lowest 10% rate will disappear entirely, and everyone who actually pays income tax will pay more.

  1. the 2011-2012 payroll tax cuts expire, which means Social Security and self-employment taxes go up by 2% on all earned income up to $113,700. Two percent may not sound like a lot — but it means higher taxes for about 163 million working Americans.
  2. new taxes imposed by the 2010 “Obamacare” legislation take effect – the Medicare portion of Social Security and self-employment taxes goes up from 2.9% to 3.8% on earned income topping $200,000 ($250,000 for joint filers). And there’s a new 3.8% “Unearned Income Medicare Contribution” (which sounds so much better than “tax’) on “net investment income” (interest, dividends, capital gains, rents, royalties, and annuities) over those same amounts.
  3. the Alternative Minimum Tax exemptions revert back to where they stood in 2000. Under current law, those exemptions are not adjusted for inflation. So, every couple of years, Congress “patches” the system by temporarily raising the exemptions to where they would be if they were indexed for inflation. The AMT currently hits about 4½ million Americans – but without the “patch,” that number explodes to 33 million.

Oh, and do not think dying solves your tax problem. That is because estate taxes, which currently start at 45% on estates over $5 million, will jump to 55% on estates over just $1 million.

So, January 1 2013 is our fiscal cliff, and we’re hurtling towards it.  What can we do? Well, plenty of legislators have proposed extending part or all of the Bush tax cuts, extending the payroll tax cuts, patching the AMT, and raising the estate tax exemption. But actually passing anything will be a challenge — Congress has passed just 132 bills this year, and 20% of those were to name post offices!

The partisan gridlock has many observers convinced that we will actually go over that fiscal cliff. We may see Washington wait for the election results and pass something noncontroversial like the AMT patch before the end of the year. Then in 2013 they will pass legislation extending at least part of the Bush tax cuts and make it retroactive to January 1.

We, the Chicago Accountants want you to know that we are watching everything closely to help you make the most of your opportunities and avoid land mines where possible. And remember, we are here for your family, friends, and colleagues, too so give us a call: 773-728-1500

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MARRIED COUPLES VS. SAME SEX COUPLES? WHO PAYS MORE: BY CHICAGO CPA

The federal 1996 Defense of Marriage Act doesn’t offer tax breaks for gay spouses even more because the federal government doesn’t recognize gay marriage it results in paying as much as $6,000 extra a year for the same sex couples.

While filing jointly, as a married couple provides tax benefits, the same sex couples can not enjoy the same perks because they are not allowed to file their federal returns jointly.

However, there are some states (more than 12 now) that grant full or partial marriage rights to same sex couples, but the federal government is governed by the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, which has the support of conservatives who consider that repealing the act would erode religious liberty for people who believe in the traditional definition of marriage.

We, the Chicago CPA have done the following analysis to compare who would pay more in individual income tax – A Married couple or a same sex couple??

Just to make it clearer we will give you an example of the act’s tax implications for a family with one spouse earning $100,000 and the other spouse staying home with the family’s two kids.

Case I: same sex couple

The working spouse files as head of a household and the spouse that stays home with the kids is considered to be a qualifying relative. As a result the federal tax owed by the household’s is $13,199.

Case II: married couple

The tax liability that the married couple who files a jointly tax return would be $8,656.

The result is a $4543 higher payment for the same sex couple. WHY? Because when you file as head of a household such a designation comes with disadvantages. When you file as head of a household instead of married filing jointly exposes more income to a higher bracket, plus the standard deductions are lower for a head of household than they are for married couples filing jointly.

To find out which status is right for you, please call us at 773-728-1500.

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Hot Thoughts

What do Margaret Mitchell, Mark Twain, and Shaquille O’Neill all have in common? None of them like paying taxes, that’s what! Here’s a collection of tax quotes to start your day.

“Death and taxes and childbirth. There’s never any convenient time for any of them.”
Margaret Mitchell

“Blessed are the young, for they shall inherit the national debt.”
Herbert Hoover

“You know we all hate paying taxes, but the truth of the matter is without our tax money, many politicians wouldn’t be able to afford prostitutes.”
Jimmy Kimmel

“The government deficit is the difference between the amount of money the government spends and the amount it has the nerve to collect.”
Sam Ewing

“Basic tax, as everyone knows, is the only genuinely funny subject in law school.”
Martin Ginsburg (Professor, Georgetown University Law Center)

“You’d be surprised at the frivolous things people spend their money on. Taxes, for example.”
Nuveen Investments (Advertisement)

“If you sell your soul to the Devil, do you need a receipt for tax purposes?”
Mark Russell

“I shall never use profanity except in discussing house rent and taxes.”
Mark Twain

“Last time I looked at a check, I said to myself, ‘Who the hell is FICA? And when I meet him, I’m going to punch him in the face. Oh my God, FICA is killing me.’”
Shaquille O’Neill

“The invention of the teenager was a mistake. Once you identify a period of life in which people get to stay out late but don’t have to pay taxes — naturally, no one wants to live any other way.”
Judith Martin (“Miss Manners”)

We hope you enjoyed these quotes. But please remember this: there’s nothing funny about paying more tax than you legally have to. If this summer’s heat has your blood boiling about taxes and you’re looking for a plan to pay less, call us today: 773-728-1500!

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Show Me the Money!

The week before last, while most of America was still digesting news of the Supreme Court’s decision on healthcare reform, more news hit the wires. That’s right, Hollywood A-listers Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, better known as “TomKat,” are calling it quits after nearly six years of marriage. Of course, Tom has been down this road twice before. But this split has already spawned far and away the biggest headlines, and tinseltown gossips are working overtime. How long has Katie planned her escape? What role does Cruise’s association with the controversial Church of Scientology really play? Are Tom’s lawyers really letting Katie “play the media” while they ready his reply?

News of the split comes at nearly the same time as Forbes naming Cruise the world’s top-earning actor. His latest blockbuster, #4 in the Mission Impossible franchise, pulled in a whopping $700 million, powering Cruise to a $75 million year. So naturally, we want to know what the divorce means for the IRS!

Divorce is usually pretty straightforward, at least from the taxman’s perspective. Property settlements between divorcing spouses are generally tax-free. Alimony or spousal support is usually deductible by the payor and taxable to the payee — which lets the divorcing couple shift the tax burden on that income from the higher-taxed “ex” to the lower-taxed ex. Child support is both nondeductible and nontaxable — it’s strictly an after-tax obligation. And legal fees are a nondeductible personal expense, except for amounts allocated to figuring alimony payments.

But celebrity divorces can be risky business. Sometimes it’s hard for outsiders to understand the stakes, which can be as different from ordinary splits as night and day. Katie has hired a top gun New York attorney to represent her, one who knows all the right moves where celebrity divorce is concerned. You can be sure the tabloids are rooting for a war of the worlds — we just hope daughter Suri, age 6, doesn’t end up as collateral damage.

The Cruises have a prenup, of course. It reportedly gives Katie $3 million for each year of marriage, plus a 5,878 square foot house in Montecito, CA, where Oprah Winfrey, Kevin Costner, and Rob Lowe also have homes. And last year, Cruise deeded Holmes an apartment in Manhattan. We’re sure the firm that drafted TomKat’s prenup did a fine job. Of course, golfer Tiger Woods also had a prenup limiting wife Elin Nordegrin to $20 million — but she wound up walking away with five times that amount.

What sort of romantic prospects will the couple enjoy after the divorce? Well, Cruise should be fine. He’s already a legend — he can sit back with a cocktail and audition new starlets for the role of Wife #4. And as for Holmes, she’s still young, so we’re sure she can still attract at least a few good men who want to show her the color of their money.

So Hollywood is playing “Taps” for Tom and Katie’s storytale romance. It wasn’t endless love after all. Who do you think will “win” the PR battle? Or will they settle quietly and let the story fade into oblivion?

If you look carefully at this email, you’ll find references to seventeen Tom Cruise movies. Can’t find ‘em all? Send us an email at info@taxcutters.com . We’re experts at finding hidden opportunities, especially where it comes to taxes, so if you have questions call us: 773-728-1500!!

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